Useful links for carers

Useful links for carers in the local area
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Carers UK Resources for Carers

Under each subtitle below are links to the these fact sheets which can be downloaded free of charge.

Upfront Guide

If you are new to caring the Carer Upfront guide will take you straight to the information you may need to know.

www.carersuk.org/upfront/

Looking After Someone is a guide for anyone caring for family or friends. The guide outlines your rights as a carer and gives an overview of the practical and financial support available.

www.carersuk.org/looking-after-someone


Carer’s Allowance is the main benefit for carers. If you are looking after someone for 35 hours a week or more, you may be eligible.

www.carersuk.org/carersallowance


Attendance Allowance is something you may be entitled to if you are looking after someone who has a disability or illness and is aged 65 or over. Please note that the current version of these factsheets is 2015/16

www.carersuk.org/attendanceallowance


Coming Out of Hospital factsheet outlines your rights as a carer during the hospital discharge procedure, the steps that should be followed before the person you care for is discharged from hospital, and what to do if things go wrong.

www.carersuk.org/hospital


Help with Council Tax factsheet looks at what help is available for council tax and what to do if you disagree with a council tax decision.

www.carersuk.org/counciltax


Major changes have been brought in to how support is provided to people who need help with their rent through Housing Benefit.

www.carersuk.org/bedroom-tax


Disability Living Allowance (DLA) may be available if you are looking after a child with a health condition or disability who is under the age of 16 years

www.carersuk.org/DLA


Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is a benefit that replaces Disability Living Allowance (DLA) for people of working age. This factsheet can be used if you are claiming PIP on behalf of the person you are looking after or for yourself.

www.carersuk.org/PIP


Assessments and the Care Act This factsheet contains information about the new system of care and support that will come into place in England on 1 April 2015 when the Care Act 2014 and the Children and Families Act 2014 are implemented.

www.carersuk.org/assessments


Nutrition Resources for Carers and Those They Care For

Under each subtitle below are links to the Nutricia booklets which can be downloaded free of charge. However, if you wish to order paper copies of the leaflets, please visit Carers UK website

Speaking to your GP

Carers often worry about the nutritional intake of the person they care for. If you have concerns it is important to seek help from their GP. Use this booklet to help prepare for your discussion regarding the health and nutritional intake of the person you care for with their GP.

http://bit.ly/2uOfmNn


Eating well and cancer

If the person you care for has cancer, it is more important than ever that they eat well. This booklet is for anyone caring for a person with cancer and provides useful information and tips on how to help them eat well.

http://bit.ly/2JyK82l


Eating well and COPD

COPD can have an effect on the whole body and, if the person you care for has COPD, it is more important than ever that they eat well. This booklet is for anyone caring for a person with COPD and provides useful information and tips on how to help them eat well.

http://bit.ly/2LxAyhZ


Eating well and Stroke

Being well nourished is important in recovering from a stroke. Many people who have had a stroke, however, find it more difficult to get the food and drink they need in the right balance. This booklet is for anyone caring for a person following a stroke and provides useful information and tips on how to help them eat well.

http://bit.ly/2L9qEqH


Eating well with Dementia

Many people living with dementia may experience a change in their relationship with food, eating and drinking. As dementia progresses, the behavioural, emotional and physical changes that occur can make eating and drinking more difficult. This booklet is for anyone caring for a person with dementia and provides useful information and tips on how to help them eat well.

http://bit.ly/2msvuk3


The importance of eating well for carers

As a carer, eating a balanced diet is essential to provide your body with all the nutrients it needs. A balanced diet will keep your body strong and give you enough energy to provide the best care for the person you are caring for and yourself. This booklet is for carers to help them understand what a balanced diet looks like and how to fit it into your lifestyle.

http://bit.ly/2uCyoqM


Understanding the nutrition gap and how it affects the person you care for

During times of illness, or when recovering from an operation or recent infection, many people can find it difficult to eat enough food, which can result in unexpected weight loss. If the body is not provided with enough food over a period of time it could suffer from a nutrition gap, also known as ‘undernutrition.’ Healthcare professionals may also refer to this as malnutrition. This booklet explains how a nutrition gap develops and how nutritional intake can be improved.

http://bit.ly/2LvGBn6


The role of good nutrition when caring for someone

Many people, when living with a medical condition, recovering from an illness or operation, or even as they get older, may find they cannot eat as much as usual and sometimes lose weight. This booklet is for carers and provides general information about how to help the person you’re caring for to eat well, and what to do if they are not.

http://bit.ly/2uNCxaS

Carers UK has produced a number of fact sheets which you may find useful in your caring role. You can see them on the Rutland Information Service: Carers UK Resources for Carers
(Under each subtitle there are further links to the fact sheets which can be downloaded free of charge)

Nutricia and Carers UK have worked together to produce a range of informative leaflets for carers about looking after their own health and nutrition and that of the person they care for.

 Nutrition Resources for Carers and Those They Care For

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